50×50 Movement https://www.50x50movement.org Tue, 13 Oct 2020 07:51:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://www.50x50movement.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/50x50movement-icon-150x150.png 50×50 Movement https://www.50x50movement.org 32 32 Michelle Herrera Mulligan https://www.50x50movement.org/person/michelle-herrera-mulligan/ https://www.50x50movement.org/person/michelle-herrera-mulligan/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 07:50:05 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=388 Founding Editor-in-Chief, Cosmo for Latinas Magazine Michelle Herrera Mulligan’s Story   Michelle Herrera Mulligan is a writer and editor with 20 years of experience. Her essays and articles have reached more than 1 million people online and in print in the past two years, in publications ranging from The New York Times magazine to Elle.com. She was the […]

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Founding Editor-in-Chief, Cosmo for Latinas Magazine

Michelle Herrera Mulligan’s Story

 

Michelle Herrera Mulligan is a writer and editor with 20 years of experience. Her essays and articles have reached more than 1 million people online and in print in the past two years, in publications ranging from The New York Times magazine to Elle.com. She was the founding editor in chief of Cosmo For Latinas magazine, and built a community that consistently reached 2-3 million readers per month online and more than 100,000 on the newsstand.  A frequent college speaker and writing coach, she feels especially inspired to work on projects focused creating a vision, owning one’s voice, and building a dream, which she spoke about at a Tedx conference hosted at Barnard College titled “Dream Wild.” An expert in the Latino millennial market, she has spoken at colleges around the country and her books, including the anthologies Border-Line Personalities and Count on Me, have been course-adopted at universities across the country. She also hopes to mentor and lead all underrepresented voices in the mainstream, which she has worked to do everywhere from Guernica magazine to Cosmopolitan.

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The Honorable Lauri J. Fitz-Pegado https://www.50x50movement.org/person/honorable-lauri-j-fitz-pegado/ https://www.50x50movement.org/person/honorable-lauri-j-fitz-pegado/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 07:45:15 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=384 Partner, The Livingston Group The Honorable Lauri J. Fitz-Pegado’s Story   Lauri Fitz Pegado is an international executive with a breadth of experience resolving crises, managing issues, resources and people. She navigates countries and challenges, maintaining focus on successes and delivering return on investment. A partner at the Livingston Group, she leads the international, education […]

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Partner, The Livingston Group

The Honorable Lauri J. Fitz-Pegado’s Story

 

Lauri Fitz Pegado is an international executive with a breadth of experience resolving crises, managing issues, resources and people. She navigates countries and challenges, maintaining focus on successes and delivering return on investment.

A partner at the Livingston Group, she leads the international, education and non-profit practices providing strategic counsel to domestic and international clients –foreign governments, US and foreign corporations, non-profits, educational institutions and industry associations.

She volunteers her time to provide advisory and mentoring services to several educational organizations including the University of Denver’s International Career Advancement Program at the Aspen Institute, the Ron Brown Scholars Program, the International Women’s Forum and Ernst and Young’s Women Athletes Business Network. Currently the only female partner at The Livingston Group, Lauri Fitz-Pegado is a champion for development and the career advancement of women. She is a director on the DC board of the International Women’s Forum; she has served as a Corporate Ambassador for Vital Voices and is a member of the Women’s Foreign Policy Group. She is Vice Chair of the board for the non-profit Global Communities, is on the board of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, served for ten years on the Board of the National Education Association and was Board Chair, is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Washington Government Relations Group. 

She has represented over 20 countries and many corporations to support issues including normalizing diplomatic relations, lifting trade sanctions and facilitating investment.  She designs and implements strategies to increase market share, secure funding, promote development, open new markets, enhance brand recognition, create an enabling regulatory/legislative/policy environment and improve networks and visibility. Fitz-Pegado has facilitated foreign direct investment in the US from the gas, renewable energy and mining sectors valued at over $20 Billion.   

Fitz-Pegado previously served as an Assistant Secretary of Commerce during President Clinton’s administration. She managed 130 offices overseas and 90 in the United States facilitating services to help small and medium sized companies export and advocating for major US companies competing for foreign contracts. Working with Secretaries Ron Brown, Mickey Kantor and William Daley, she established Commercial Centers in international Big Emerging Markets, in Russia and the Newly Independent States (NIS); integrated the overseas and domestic field operations to improve service to the business community and supported and led countless trade missions all over the world.

Experienced in executive level management positions, Lauri Fitz-Pegado led the Global Gateway Management and Corporate Affairs and Communications departments for Iridium, LLC.  A Motorola creation and pioneer of its time, the global satellite and paging company benefited from her trade and negotiating ability to develop and maintain key relationships with domestic and foreign entities essential to regulatory approvals and operations. Fitz-Pegado managed relationships with investor companies, facilitated regulatory approval requirements, secured permits and licenses and later managed investor and media relations.  

She was a managing director at Hill and Knowlton Public Affairs and an executive at Gray and Company for over a decade.  For several years, Fitz-Pegado served as a Foreign Service Information Office.  As a United States diplomat in the Dominican Republic and Mexico, she managed cultural events, education exchanges, and media relations. Fitz-Pegado performed with the Dominican Ballet Company and taught dance in Mexico City.

Fitz-Pegado graduated cum laude with Phi Beta Kappa honors from Vassar College before earning her Master of Arts in International Affairs from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University.  She speaks Spanish and Portuguese.

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Constitutional Courts in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa: Where are We in Terms of Parity? https://www.50x50movement.org/article/constitutional-courts-latin-america-and-sub-saharan-africa-where-are-we-terms-parity/ https://www.50x50movement.org/article/constitutional-courts-latin-america-and-sub-saharan-africa-where-are-we-terms-parity/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 07:24:21 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=380 During the last decades, women have achieved substantial progress in women rights and specifically have advanced in the goal of gender equality in politics and the public sector around the world. While women still struggle to be treated fairly in the judicial system, it is interesting to analyze the reality of women’s representation in the […]

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During the last decades, women have achieved substantial progress in women rights and specifically have advanced in the goal of gender equality in politics and the public sector around the world. While women still struggle to be treated fairly in the judicial system, it is interesting to analyze the reality of women’s representation in the high courts and the factors that affect this representation.

Globally, constitutional courts protect citizens’ basic rights and uphold the constitution. According to our Global Women’s Leadership Initiative Index, women representation in constitutional courts is far from gender parity with a world average representation of 24.02%1 . Latin America and the Caribbean presented the best score by region (37.23%), higher than the world average and regions like Europe and Central Asia (27.37%), and East Asia and Pacific (17.78%). Latin America and The Caribbean also has a higher percentage of women represented in these courts than the OECD countries (27.41%).

Guyana has the highest female representation in constitutional courts in the world. In 2018, all the three members of Guyana’s Court of Appeal were women. In the Latin America and Caribbean region, Ecuador and Paraguay place second with women holding two-thirds (66.67%) of positions in their constitutional courts. Most countries in the region had at least one woman in their constitutional court except for El Salvador, where none of its five constitutional court judges was a female in 2018.

Women’s representation on constitutional courts in the Sub-Saharan Africa region, is 23.95% , lower than the world average (24.02%) but higher than regions such as South Asia (8.13%) and the Middle East and North Africa (6.54%). The African countries with the highest women representation in constitutional courts are Sierra Leone (60%) and Rwanda (57.14%). Countries such as South Sudan, Namibia, Mauritania, Comoros, Republic Democratic of Congo, and Sudan have no women judges in their constitutional courts.

 

What influences female representation in high courts?

Only few studies deal with female representation in higher courts and its effect on judicial decisions. On one side, factors that may increase female representation in higher courts include the number of seats2 , the commitment of civil society and gatekeepers to propose women to the higher judicial position, the end of wars, and regional diffusion of women leadership3 . Interestingly, there is no correlation between women’s participation in the legislative branch and women’s representation in the judicial brand4.

 

Why female representation in high courts matters?

We need courts to look like the people they rule over in order to raise confidence in the judicial system and its legitimacy. Further, judges that are representative of the people are better able to make decisions that are well informed and thus driving up legitimacy and quality of justice. Achieving this requires a careful analysis of processes and policies of selecting judges, as in many countries the people themselves do not select or vote for their judges. On a final note, while having more women in high courts does not guarantee that they will stand for women’s rights, it does make this case more plausible.

 

  1. World Bank. Women, Business and Law 2018. 
  2. Williams, M. S., and Thames, F. C. (2008). Women’s representation on high courts in advanced industrialized countries. Politics and Gender, 4(3), 451-471.
  3. Dawuni, J., and Kang, A. (2015). Her ladyship chief justice: the rise of female leaders in the judiciary in Africa. Africa Today, 62(2), 45-69.
  4. Escobar-Lemmon, Maria and Michelle Taylor-Robinson. 2005. “Women Ministers in Latin American Government: When, Where, and Why?” American Journal of Political Science 49(4 October):829-844

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Pakistan’s Future is Female https://www.50x50movement.org/article/pakistans-future-female/ https://www.50x50movement.org/article/pakistans-future-female/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:59:32 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=355 On Monday, July 15 2019, Gwen Young, Former Director of the Wilson Center’s Global Women’s Leadership Initiative and Women in Public Service Project led a discussion on ‘Roadmap to 50×50: Power and Parity in Women’s Leaders.’ Ms. Young was joined with Dr. Sumera Haque, who is the Director of Johns Hopkins Women’s Center at Sibley Hospital […]

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On Monday, July 15 2019, Gwen Young, Former Director of the Wilson Center’s Global Women’s Leadership Initiative and Women in Public Service Project led a discussion on ‘Roadmap to 50×50Power and Parity in Women’s Leaders.’ Ms. Young was joined with Dr. Sumera Haque, who is the Director of Johns Hopkins Women’s Center at Sibley Hospital and has served on the Advisory Council for the Women in Public Service Project. This discussion was with the women rights defenders delegation from the Potohar Organization for Development Advocacy (PODA), a non-governmental organization working to promote and protect women’s rights in rural areas of Pakistan.

In her presentation, Ms. Young highlighted the importance of focusing on all five sectors of the government, namely executive, legislative, judiciary, civil service and national security. Each government sector is critical to catalyze change and cultivate a comprehensive environment for decision-making, according to Ms. Young. She underscored the urgency to develop a platform that empowers women and provides them with the agency they truly deserve, and how the Global Women’s Leadership Initiative Index is a step in this direction. Ms. Young outlined the methodology that has been designed to close the gap in agency and leadership. This framework underscores the three pillars to achieve parity—pathways, positions and power, respectively. While the first pillar addresses women’s access to positions of leadership, the second defines leadership across the five government sectors, and the third pillar measures the formal and informal powers conceded to various positions of leadership along with the quality of governance and delivery.

Ms. Young further elaborated how data has underscored critical findings—vocational training is a vital component of the education sector, part-time work enables a greater percentage of women to achieve agency and for a significant portion of females the public sector is a good starting point for diving into gaining independence. Other key findings include how the world can achieve gender parity by breaking stereotypes for women in leadership as well as changing the public perception, since the number of women in power is highly contingent on people’s perception.

The PODA group of women’s rights defenders from Pakistan spoke about their experiences and area of expertise, which ranged from law and poetry to radio and media journalism. This delegation comprised of women of all ages, who belong to different parts of the country—each activist has a unique story and perspective on women’s leadership and power. Rani Shamim from Nankana Sahib, Punjab is a grassroots activist who has changed the fate of her village by mobilizing people through Sufi folklore and poetry. Her compositions underscore the role of women in society, the importance of literacy and inculcate inter-faith harmony. While Rani musters her community to nurture an inclusive environment via the art of Sufi folklore, Hifza Bukhari the first Assistant Attorney General at the Rawalpindi District Courts uses legal instruments to win justice for survivors of domestic violence. She also specializes in child custody and family law, and is an ardent campaigner for pro-women laws in Pakistan. Other members of the delegation comprised of Misbah Nazir and Nabeela Aslam, experts in radio journalism and professional media development and radio production, respectively. These women have mastered the art of digital storytelling and listening clubs to raise awareness about mental health and how to combat gender-based violence.

Each member of this delegation is striving to gain representation for women in all realms of Pakistan’s economic, financial and social environment. They highlighted that knowledge is power and for centuries men have controlled its dissemination—now the time is up for these men as women are using their expertise to undo this longstanding patriarchal control.

Female activists like Ms. Young along with members of the Pakistani delegation are symbols of resilience, strength and empowerment. These women are shattering the glass ceiling, breaking the stereotypes of a patriarchal society to unleash other women from the shackles of fear and insecurity. They have empowered one another and every woman they represent—the future is female and all these women are most definitely leading this change.

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Ellysse Dick https://www.50x50movement.org/person/ellysse-dick/ https://www.50x50movement.org/person/ellysse-dick/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:53:31 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=351 Communications Assistant Ellysse Dick’s Story Ellysse Dick is the Program Assistant for Communications at the Women in Public Service Project. She is a passionate advocate for gender equality and enjoys leveraging exciting new tools to tell the stories of global changemakers. Ellysse joined the WPSP in 2016. She oversees the program’s communications, digital content, and engagement strategies.  […]

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Communications Assistant

Ellysse Dick’s Story

Ellysse Dick is the Program Assistant for Communications at the Women in Public Service Project. She is a passionate advocate for gender equality and enjoys leveraging exciting new tools to tell the stories of global changemakers.

Ellysse joined the WPSP in 2016. She oversees the program’s communications, digital content, and engagement strategies. 

Ellysse holds a B.A.  in International Affairs, a B.A. in German Studies and a Certificate in Middle East and Islamic Studies from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she graduated summa cum laude.

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TOOLKIT: ADVANCING WOMEN LEADERS IN AFRICA https://www.50x50movement.org/publication/toolkit-advancing-women-leaders-africa/ https://www.50x50movement.org/publication/toolkit-advancing-women-leaders-africa/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:47:55 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=347 Overview In March 2017, Dr. Joyce Banda launched her paper, “From Day One: An Agenda for Advancing Women Leaders in Africa” as the crux of her research while serving as a Distinguished Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center.  As a woman leader and former President of Malawi, Dr. Banda knows the barriers facing women who […]

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Overview

In March 2017, Dr. Joyce Banda launched her paper, “From Day One: An Agenda for Advancing Women Leaders in Africa” as the crux of her research while serving as a Distinguished Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center.  As a woman leader and former President of Malawi, Dr. Banda knows the barriers facing women who seek positions of political leadership and the opportunities to remove such barriers. 

Towards this, Dr. Banda published “From Day One: An Agenda for Advancing Women in Africa” which details the history of women’s leadership in Africa and some of the challenges and opportunities women face on their leadership journey. The paper includes five key recommendations for promoting women’s leadership in Africa:

  1. Enhance political will to empower girls, and appoint qualified women to leadership positions

  2. Mobilize rural leadership, families, and communities to promote the change of mindsets and behavior around women and girls

  3. Strengthen networks between current and emerging leaders

  4. Allocate resources towards data collection and analysis, and research around women and leadership

  5. Create the legal environment to advance women in positions of leadership

As a second phase of her research, Dr. Banda is spearheading the creation of a toolkit to provide actionable steps to implement the recommendations. The toolkit is meant to inspire and provide examples of how policymakers, civil society organizations, community leaders, and the international community can work together to develop a critical mass of women leaders in political positions across Africa to ensure good governance and economic stability, and greater stability overall.

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Perspectives on Gender Parity: Solutions Across Sectors and Borders https://www.50x50movement.org/event/perspectives-parity-solutions-across-sectors-and-borders/ https://www.50x50movement.org/event/perspectives-parity-solutions-across-sectors-and-borders/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:41:07 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=339 Time and Place Wednesday, June 6, 2018 – 12:30 PM6th Floor, The Wilson Center  Follow the conversation #ParityPerspectives   Event Details With the launch of a feminist foreign policy in 2014, Sweden has taken national progress to the international stage by integrating gender considerations into all aspects of foreign policy decision-making. At the forefront of […]

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Time and Place

6th Floor, The Wilson Center
 

Follow the conversation

#ParityPerspectives

 

Event Details

With the launch of a feminist foreign policy in 2014, Sweden has taken national progress to the international stage by integrating gender considerations into all aspects of foreign policy decision-making. At the forefront of this effort in the United States is Ambassador Karin Olofsdotter, the first woman to represent Sweden as Ambassador to the United States.

The Women in Public Service Project welcomed Ambassador Olofsdotter to the Wilson Center for a conversation on driving progress toward gender parity through diplomacy.

WPSP Director Gwen K. Young led a moderated discussion and Q&A with Ambassador Olofsdotter to explore solutions that span across sectors and borders.

 

Key Quotes

Gwen K. Young

Director, Women in Public Service Project

 

“I think the interesting thing about that culture is that it has to be both at home and in the workplace. Where in the workplace it would be looking suspicious if the man actually does not take that time. Right, so his time is valued just as much as the woman.”

“In our newly released Global Women’s Leadership Index, Sweden scored 3.5 out of 5. We’re calling it a ‘balanced parity country,’ where women can not only rise to the top in government leadership positions, but rise across sectors and portfolios of government.”

 

H.E. Ambassador Karin Olofsdotter

Ambassador of Sweden to the United States

 

“The Swedish government is the first government in the world [that] declared itself a feminist government in 2014. It is a feminist government with a feminist foreign policy. And the idea behind this is, of course, that women and men should have the same power to shape society and their own lives. I think this was a bit ridiculed in the beginning… but I think the laughing has stopped.”

“Women also need to be pushed a bit more. We need to be a bit more emboldened. Go for the positions. The head of personnel at the ministry said if we put out an advertisement for a job and you need five criteria, the woman says, ‘Oh I only have four. I can’t apply’ and the guy looked at it from a distance and said, ‘That’s me. I fit two. I’m going for it.”

“It’s really important that we … stress equality between men and women and show why it is important… We have to show the results that we can achieve.”

“It’s important to show role models to show that women, of course, can do just as good as men. It should never matter if you are a man or a woman at your job. If you can do it, you can do it.”

“I think women need to be a bit more bold. Be bold.”

 

Hosted in partnership with

 

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FROM DAY ONE: AN AGENDA FOR ADVANCING WOMEN LEADERS IN AFRICA https://www.50x50movement.org/publication/day-one-agenda-advancing-women-leaders-africa/ https://www.50x50movement.org/publication/day-one-agenda-advancing-women-leaders-africa/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:34:22 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=335 Overview Leaders are born; yet many born female in rural parts of sub-Saharan Africa go unrecognized largely because, from day one, women and girls face a political, cultural and social environment that inhibits their development into well-equipped female leaders. All across the globe, leadership programs designed and led by civil society, governments, and the international […]

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Overview

Leaders are born; yet many born female in rural parts of sub-Saharan Africa go unrecognized largely because, from day one, women and girls face a political, cultural and social environment that inhibits their development into well-equipped female leaders.

All across the globe, leadership programs designed and led by civil society, governments, and the international community seek to imbue leadership skills in women and girls. The potential impact of these programs, however, is undermined by the extremely gendered political, cultural and social practices of society. Aspiring and existing women leaders face their own unique challenges, such as lacking appropriate training and financing, violence, and issues including media coverage and fake news. More than 60% of Africa’s population lives in rural areas where these challenges, especially to young girls, are the most pronounced. In order to ensure women in Africa have the same opportunities as men to become leaders, African leaders and the international community must address the unique challenges facing women and girls to become the leaders they were born to be.

Despite the continent’s long and rich history of female leaders, particularly pre-colonization, the political, social and cultural systems and beliefs do not currently promote leadership qualities or aspirations in young girls. Concerted efforts over the last two decades have expanded access to quality education and health for many, but women’s political participation must also be a priority for the sake of good governance. To continue driving progress further and for more of those born on the continent, half of the population cannot be sidelined in decision-making. 

If only half of potential leaders are identified and supported, then policy solutions remain only halfway-forged.  African leaders primarily, as well as the international community, have a responsibility to speak out against the challenges facing women and girls to reach positions of leadership and support initiatives to eradicate them. This is particularly incumbent upon traditional and opinion leaders in the community, who must lend their voice and authority to the promotion of new traditions that ensure that every child in Africa, boy or girl, is socialized in a way that encourages them to become the leaders they were born to be.

This paper seeks to address the ways in which the girls and women who are born to be leaders are prevented from reaching their potential in sub-Saharan Africa, and proposes recommendations to ensure that more African women are represented in leadership and decision-making in government and elected office across the continent. Women’s political empowerment is vital to make good on the promise to implement the Beijing International Platform for Action of 1995, and the more recent commitment made by all 54 countries in Africa to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Beyond that, gender parity in decision-making is critical for the sake of economic development, good governance, and peace and prosperity on the continent overall.

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Rt. Hon. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila https://www.50x50movement.org/person/rt-hon-saara-kuugongelwa-amadhila/ https://www.50x50movement.org/person/rt-hon-saara-kuugongelwa-amadhila/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 04:53:18 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=327 Prime Minister of Namibia Rt. Hon. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila’s Story Mrs. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila (born 12 October 1967), born in Okahao, Omusati region, is a Namibian politician. A member of the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO), Kuugongelwa has been a member of the National Assembly of Namibia since 1995 and Minister of Finance since 2003 until […]

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Prime Minister of Namibia

Rt. Hon. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila’s Story

Mrs. Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila (born 12 October 1967), born in Okahao, Omusati region, is a Namibian politician. A member of the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO), Kuugongelwa has been a member of the National Assembly of Namibia since 1995 and Minister of Finance since 2003 until today 2014.

Kuugongelwa went into exile with SWAPO in 1980 and left for Sierra Leone In 1982 at the age of 15. She attended Koidu Girls Secondary School from 1982 to 1984 and Saint Joseph’s Secondary School from 1984 to 1987. From 1991 to 1994, Kuugongelwa attended Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, United States, where she graduated from with a degree in economics.

The Omusati native returned to Namibia following graduation from Lincoln and took a position as a desk officer in the Office of the President under Sam Nuujoma. At the age of 27 in 1995, Saara Kuugongelwa was named Director General, National Planning Commission at Government of Namibia.  She has been Prime Minister of Namibia since March 2015.

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Numbers Matter: Data Driving Global Parity https://www.50x50movement.org/event/numbers-matter-data-driving-global-parity/ https://www.50x50movement.org/event/numbers-matter-data-driving-global-parity/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 04:42:10 +0000 https://www.50x50movement.org/?p=311 Time and Place Wednesday, May 3, 2017 – 01:00 PM5th Floor, The Wilson Center  Follow the conversation #NumbersMatter   Event Details The first in a nationwide series of launches, this event marked the introduction of a data driven approach to advancing women’s representation in policy and political leadership. The event included an analysis of the […]

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Time and Place

5th Floor, The Wilson Center
 

Follow the conversation

#NumbersMatter

Event Details

The first in a nationwide series of launches, this event marked the introduction of a data driven approach to advancing women’s representation in policy and political leadership. The event included an analysis of the findings from five initial case studies around national level data from the United States, Canada, Sweden, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

On May 3rd, a panel with WPSP Data Partners discussed the data landscape, noticeable gaps in the numbers, and opportunities to leverage this data to drive institutional change toward global gender parity. The speakers were Gwen K. Young, Director of The Women in Public Service Project, Mallory Barg Bulman, Vice President of Research and Evaluation, Partnership for Public Service, Ciara Lee, International Consultant, Gender Equality in Public Administration, Governance and Peacebuilding Cluster, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Dr. Chantal de Jonge Oudraat, President of Women in International Security (WIIS), and Cynthia Terrell, Founder and Director of Representation2020 and FairVote.

 

Key Quotes

 

Gwen Young

“One of our tools is to build out this data framework. We are aiming to have a global index where we are able to look at where women are in leadership positions vis-a-vis other indicators. To really give us a snapshot of where women are, where they exercise leadership and power, what the barriers are, and to drive institutional change.”

“We are looking at data across the government. So not just how many presidents or how many parliamentarians, which is a lot of what we see in the most accessible data; but public administration – where do they sit in national security, how many mayors, where do they sit in police forces, where do they sit in judicial forces.”

 

Mallory Barg Bulman

“This is an important effort when you look at gender parity and trying to reach that goal of 50/50. First of all if you don’t know where you are, it’s hard to know how more you have to go. Also, just the transparency of the data alone really helps drive the change, it starts the conversation and gets that into the discourse.”

 

Ciara Lee

“From a UNDP perspective, we noticed, on a global scale, that public administration is often always left out of the discourse on women’s leadership in government, and is often left out of the data and evidence.”

“For us, public administration is so important first and foremost because it is a normative issue, it’s an issue of rights for women to be represented in the public administration. Second of all, the public administration is often the single largest employer in a country, so it’s also a matter of women’s economic empowerment, and the impact on the economy. Thirdly, we find that the influence or power of civil servants is often overlooked and the way that they can decide how policy gets implemented, what gets prioritized, and also as policymakers themselves. When we add up all these components of the public administration, we can see that having gender balance in the civil service will impact government but also the state society relationship as the implementers of policy.”

 

Chantal de Jonge Oudraat

“It is very important to have the numbers out there; the numbers allow us to hold political leaders accountable.”

“Implementation remains really difficult. Having data to be able to show whether there is progress or not, is really important.”

 

Cynthia Terrell

“Parity means racial representation, geographic representation and partisan representation.”

“The reason that data is important to me is that it should drive our strategies for change. If we really are data experts and we embrace the fact that data really should motivate our decisions, then we should invest in the things that are shown to elect more women. Those things include quotas, they include voting systems, they include internal legislative measures, is there onsite child care, how well are women paid once they are in government, and how are they selected via committee chair. The data shows that’s what gets women elected. The data doesn’t support just doing what we are doing alone anymore.”

As emphasized by the speakers, data is a powerful tool to achieve gender parity, especially in public administration. The new Women in Public Service Project data framework measures not just how many women are heads of government or in parliaments, but also women’s representation at all levels of political and policy leadership from the national down to the local level, and across multiple sectors of public service. Working with data partners including Boardwalk Leadership, the Partnership for Public Service, Representation2020, and the United Nations Development Programme, WPSP will deliver the world’s most comprehensive collection of sex-disaggregated data on women’s leadership.

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